A review of Frankenstein (or The Modern Prometheus)

Like many people, I thought that Frankenstein was a monster. You know, the monster strapped to a table, and comes alive from a mad scientist yelling “It’s ALIVE!!”. Yes, I know, that idea seems silly now that I’ve read the novel. It turns out, Victor Frankenstein created the monster, and the monster is referred to as Frankenstein’s monster.

This classic is a fantastic, spooky and mysterious read. The dialect can get a little hard to read if you aren’t a big classic reader. Other than that, the story is very easy to follow.

frankenstein

 

The first part of the book is centered around Victor and his early life as a child. From a young age, he knew that he wanted to become a scientist. More than anything, he wanted to create something great. When victor is around the age of 20, he attends a college and quickly excelled in the art of science. He then becomes obsessed with outdated theories from crazy scientists who thought that they could perfect humans with science by changing them. Victor then takes the scientists’ ideas and puts them into action. Little did he know that he would achieve the unthinkable and the most horrifying.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley started writing the story when she was 18, and the first edition of the novel was published anonymously in London in 1818, when she was 20. Shelley’s name first appeared on the second edition, published in France in 1823. Her book was highly praised when it first was published, and it is infused with elements of the Gothic novel and the Romantic movement. At the same time, it is an early example of science fiction.

I highly recommend this book, the story is very entertaining and spooky. It is a captivating read, and you’ll think about Victor and his monster long after you’ve read the book.

 

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